Drinks

179

Grownup Gingery Arnold Palmer (V)

As I’ve been waxing on about lately, I’m very into the post-work cocktails this summer. Whether I’m mixing them myself¬†or hitting up my favorite Montclair bars, they make boring weekday nights infinitely more tolerable.¬†I was recently gifted a bottle of¬†sweet tea vodka¬†and ooooh man it is yummy. Upon receiving said bottle, the first thing I did was sniff it: to my surprise it actually smelled like¬†tea. This was exciting. When I see¬†flavored¬†liquor, it pretty immediately calls to mind those horrifying electric-hued¬†bottles claiming to taste “just like pop-tarts/mint chocolate chip ice cream/marshmallow fluff.” I once had to endure a truly horrifying shot of birthday cake-flavored vodka, which, if you know anything about my penchant for desserts, was insulting on so very many levels. While I know this is not always the case with flavored liquors, I’m often wary. So imagine my joy upon taking that first sip and being greeted by a very real tea taste. Let’s also note the joy that comes with getting a present out of nowhere. Presents are f u n. Even more fun when they are alcohol-oriented. Because that means the gift-giver is immediately entitled to a cocktail.

The first drink I made with the vodka was a simple minty/tea (or should I get cute and say “min-tea”) Moscow mule –which I’ve just learned is also known as a Vodka buck (?????)– because I had ginger beer and lime and a plethora¬†of fresh mint. And a mule mug¬†(I’m hoping to build my collection of these and julep cups once I have a kitchen of my own.) I’m a pretty big fan of the Moscow mule. It’s spicy and tart and bubbly. It also calls to mind this gem, which just makes me giggle. So that was a good place to spend the first few ounces of the vodka. But I knew that the next time I used it I wanted to make up my own drink. Since few things feel more summery to me than a tall glass of lemonade or iced tea, I thought a thought I often think: let’s add alcohol to it. And I’m pretty sure I did alright. Thank you, alcohol. You be the judge, mmk?

But before you do, here’s some stuff that’s been occupying my time on the internet lately:

Alison Roman‘s drink diary on Punch Drink

I think I like tomatoes now that I’ve seen this salad on A Brown Table

Cherry pie and “women’s work” on Paste

The blood and sand cocktail (which tastes like neither blood nor sand) gets even better when blended on Serious Eats

Sprouted Kitchen is killing it as per usual with this roasted banana coconut ice cream helllllllo

French fry toppings of the world (and some pretty sweet graphics) on Lucky Peach

Saveur is taking me back to the retro origins of this blog and also reminding me that I could survive on dips for the rest of my life (also happy 21st birthday, Saveur!)

Porridge and a man bun in one glorious post on What Should I Eat For Breakfast Today yes yes all the yes

Let me eat all 13 of these beautiful vegetable things right this minute, thank you Grub Street for putting them in one handy post

OKAY now let’s have a cocktail!

Palmer (serves 1)

1/2-inch piece fresh ginger
1 shot sweet tea vodka
1 shot elderflower liqueur
1/2 shot fresh lemon juice
lemon peel

Muddle ginger in a cocktail shaker. Fill the shaker with a generous amount of ice. Add vodka, elderflower liqueur, and lemon juice. Shake well (20 seconds should do the trick!) Strain into a coupe/martini glass. Rub the lemon peel around the rim of the glass, then float it on top as garnish. Alternatively: muddle the ginger and add the liquids. Stir well and strain into an ice-filled rocks glass, doing the same with the lemon peel as mentioned earlier.

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Book Review, Drinks

177

Mint Julep [from The Art of American Whiskey] (V)

There’s something about summer that makes cocktail hour come sooner and last longer. You step out of work, walk into a pub, and order a beer at 5:03 and no one thinks anything of it; in fact, you’re not the first one to arrive– not by a long shot. You walk into a bar on a Tuesday night and you have to squeeze in between the hipsters to get a seat. No one looks at you funny for ordering a second watermelon tequila smash. Or a third. It’s the most wonderful time of the year! I’ve been getting very into making festive post-work cocktails lately, so just stay tuned.

Don’t tell anyone, but I think I like developing cocktail recipes more than food ones. Flavor combinations are more delicate. There is the finest line between a good cocktail and a¬†great¬†cocktail. Sure, I can throw a shot of this and two fingers of that and some muddled fruit in a highball glass and it’ll be pretty darn good. Add a squeeze of lime and maybe it’ll be really good. But a great cocktail needs no embellishment, save for a few herbs or citrus peel. Which brings me to my next point: the mint julep.

No, no, I did not invent the mint julep (duh,) but I am using it as a benchmark for my cocktail developing from now on. It’s so simple, but tastes truly amazing. It seriously makes me want to forget the time in my life when I thought a good cocktail was cheap rum mixed with cream soda. Oooof. Anyway, I’ve been digging¬†bourbon lately. Like, having-a-nightly-glass kind of digging¬†it. And when Noah Rothbaum‘s new book, The Art of American Whiskey¬†arrived at my doorstep a few weeks ago, I knew I was about to dive into a full-on love affair. Whiskey is rad. We all know it. Even if you don’t like the taste of it, you know it’s pretty cool. I’ve met many people who claim to be whiskey aficionados –the amount of times I’ve had to listen to mansplaining about which scotch is superior makes my head hurt– but Noah¬†actually knows his stuff. He travels¬†his way through history chapter by chapter, starting with “The Late 1800s and Early 1900s,” “Prohibition,” and “Life After Temperance;” all the way up to “The Swinging Sixties,” “The Seventies, Eighties, and Nineties, aka the Dark Ages,” and “The New Golden Age” (right now.)¬†He details political and economic implications behind whiskey (and liquor in general) during the various decades, as well as how the drinks fit into the social climate of the times. Each chapter¬†features cocktail recipes from various contributors that were originally developed during the corresponding time period. Along the way, he includes¬†images of label art of the top 100 iconic whiskey bottles– easily my favorite part of the book. The recipes take a bit of a backseat to the historical notes, but that didn’t bother me as much as I thought it was going to after the first chapter. It’s definitely¬†much more of a coffee table book than a standard cookbook, but¬†that shouldn’t dissuade you from picking up a copy. Grab the book, make a cocktail, then enjoy it while you read and work your way towards becoming a¬†whiskey buff.

The mint julep hails from the 1800s, and was originally made with the grape-based brandy cognac. But when cognac stock was depleted from pests attacking European grape crops, bartenders were forced to switch to whiskey and gin. I made¬†a¬†julep with cognac after the real thing and it just doesn’t hold up. Try it yourself and see what you think!

Mint Julep (from The Art of American Whiskey, contributed by Allen Katz; makes 1 cocktail)

8 fresh mint leaves + sprig for garnish
1 teaspoon granulated sugar
2 1/2 ounces bourbon

Muddle¬†mint, sugar, and a small amount of crushed ice in a julep cup (I don’t have one, but¬†this one¬†is now on my wish¬†list. If you don’t have one either, a highball glass or mason jar work just fine.) Add more crushed ice to fill half the cup, then add the bourbon. Stir until the cup becomes frosty, then add more ice to fill the cup all the way to the top. Garnish with mint and drink with a straw (that crushed ice gets everrrrrrywhere.)

NOTE: I received this book from Blogging for Books in exchange for this review. Check out this review on their website too!

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Drinks

169

Coffee Ice Old Fashioned (V)

So yesterday I had my last classes at Smith. The final ten minutes of my very last class consisted of listening to people read a scene from the short play I’ve been working on this semester. I’ve written a lot of short scenes before, for this course and when I took playwriting I two years ago, but I’ve never done a fuller-length piece. I wanted to actually commit to something this semester. I wanted to make something that wasn’t food or a drawing, because I’ve made a whole lot of those and it’s time to try new things already! I wrote a 37-page play, and apparently it was not bad at all! Spoiler: I’m very self-conscious about my writing. About my place as a person who does any academic work, honestly. I guess I know the source of that problem, and I probably shouldn’t let it get to me, but that’s not a story for the blog- at least not today, anyway. This is a meandering way of commenting on how pleasantly surprised I was to hear people laugh at the lines I wrote to be funny; to hear someone actually refer to one of my characters’ actions from a scene read earlier this semester; to listen to my professor’s encouraging comments about words I wrote for the sole purpose of just making something. It was kind of a beautiful way to finish my work here. #feelings, amirite? Class ended and I left the theatre building (geesh, how many times have I done that this year?) and had one of those weird moments where I stopped and realized that was it. I’m done. Okay, technically, I still have to write five more pages of a paper and finish up a few other things, but really, I’m done. Done with college.¬†I honestly don’t know whether to cry with joy or genuine fear. Mostly it doesn’t feel real at all. So while I’m figuring out how to feel about the fact that I graduate in -count ’em- seventeen days and then find my way back to Jersey, let’s talk about this cocktail I made last night.

If you’ve been a reader of Spices and Spatulas for a while, you’re well aware of the fact that I’m a big fan of coffee. A true caffiend, as I’ve mentioned. While deep down I know that the best way to start the morning is with a big glass of water, I never do it. If I don’t have coffee within the first 15 minutes of being awake, I start to get a little grumpy. If I don’t have more later in the day, I’ll start to get a really terrible headache. Which, honestly, is actually probably really bad and I should work on weaning myself off it a bit. But that day is not today. Today, we will be putting coffee in liquor (again) and everyone will be buzzing out of their skin and it’ll be delicious. PS-¬†I know the brown ice isn’t the most aesthetically pleasing, but just accept it; it tastes AMAZING. Also, yes, I did I fact use a $1 nip of Jim Beam because I am classy.

Cocktail (serves 1)

3 coffee ice cubes (see below)
1/2 teaspoon brown sugar
1 1/2 ounces Bourbon or Rye Whiskey
2 dashes bitters
orange slice

Make the coffee ice cubes:¬†Brew a strong pot of coffee and let it cool to room temperature. Pour into ice cube trays and freeze. If you’re really on your cocktail game you should make them in this tray; much prettier than the tiny ice. You’ll only need 3 for this drink, so throw the rest in a freezer bag and to cool iced coffee without it getting watery! (and maybe make yourself a frozen mocha¬†or throw a few into a milkshake.)

Make the cocktail: Put a¬†rocks glass in the freezer.¬†Dissolve the brown sugar in 1 tablespoon water and set aside. Remove the glass from the freezer and place¬†3 coffee ice cubes in the bottom of it. Pour the sugar mixture over the ice, then do the same with the Bourbon/Rye and bitters. Swirl it all together and garnish with an orange slice, adding a little extra squeeze of juice if you so choose. Sip slowly for a mellow but intense buzz, sip fast if you’re tryna get weird. Either way, you just got a bit¬†closer to being¬†this guy.

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Drinks

159

Negroni (V, GF)
+ Food-Themed Valentines

Happy Valentine’s Day, everyone! I hope you’re¬†all looking forward to spending today with someone¬†you¬†love (Netflix totally counts right?)¬†Regardless of who or what you’re planning to hang with today, it is without a doubt you’ll be in need of a stiff cocktail at some point. So of course, I’m going to share a red drink to stay on theme. It’s a Negroni, which happens to be one of my all-time favorite cocktails. It’s simple and elegant, but packs a punch..it is allll liquor. I love ordering them at different places, as every bartender makes their Negroni¬†a little differently. But I also really am a fan of making this cocktail at home. The 1:1:1 ratio couldn’t be simpler, and the orange peel really knocks it out of the park.

Not to get too sappy, but I am so happy that you all read my blog. You’re my Valentines this year. I wanted to give every reader a Valentine because there are so many amazing food blogs, and any time you spend reading mine instead of the billions of others is so appreciated. I obviously had to find something food related, and in my search I discovered that apparently there are many¬†vintage valentines involving hot dog puns (??) and a lot of food with faces. Pretty cute stuff, guys. Just fyi, I don’t own any of these images, but I do think they’re adorable and I wanted to share them in a handy way so I made little Valentine sheets! Click¬†here¬†and¬†here¬†to see them, print a million, and give them out to everyone you know!

Negroni

1 oz gin
1 oz Campari
1 oz sweet vermouth
orange peel

Add gin, Campari, and vermouth to a cocktail shaker. Give it a good shake and pour into a martini glass or a rocks glass with ice. Garnish with orange peel. Sip many.

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Musing

*Happy New Year(‘s Eve)*

2015 is upon us! And in my humble opinion, thank GOD. 2014 was rough. I don’t know about you, but I’m seriously ready to give ’15 a try. It will lead to graduation, (maybe) a job, a new -or old- home, and a healthy dose of uncertainty. Regardless of whether these things will lead to happiness or tears, I’m excited for it. For something new. It’s about time. So let’s celebrate the end of the year with many drinks!

Having a party? These large-batch cocktails¬†have pleased every group I’ve ever served!

A bit of wine is always a nice way to ensure the party gets going- while also avoiding any guests wearing a lampshade at 10:30. White Lightning Sangria is light, simple and can be made several hours before you have to play host!

The last time I made this citrusy Gin Punch (and edible glitter ice block!!) I was informed my party co-host and I kept adding more gin as the night went on, telling everyone it was better that way. Which likely explains why NYE 2012 is just a bit foggy..

Planning to day drink? Skip the beer (and the nap) by breaking out the Cranberry Lime Punch! A little Prosecco never hurt a soul.

The following cocktail recipes serve 1, but this can easily be remedied for any kind of festivity

This Vodka Soda cocktail is made exceedingly less boring via the addition of blood orange juice, rose water, and vermouth.

Here’s a secret: even though the majority of the liquor I drink is gin (Ron Swanson would hate me), champagne cocktails are my favorite. Try the Barbotage Sp√©cial. It does not disappoint.

If there was ever a night where you need both liquor and caffeine, this is it. Hence the espresso martini. You’re welcome, earth.

If you’re more of a¬†person¬†who likes to trick yourself¬†into getting drunk in between layers of pineapple juice, rum punch will be just your style.
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Last but not least, why not keep it classy and simple with a St-Germain cocktail?

Looking for more? Check the archives!
PS- if you don’t drink, many of these recipes would be just as delicious without the hooch!

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Drinks

152

Egg(less) Nog (V,GF)

Happy end of Hanukkah and merry Christmas Eve to those who celebrate! I think a rainy twenty fourth of December is a perfect time to share a recipe for a fairly time consuming holiday treat: egg nog! Rather, egg(less) nog, as it is vegan. This is the first time I’ve ever experimented with making my own nut milk, and I can now say with absolute certainty I know why it’s so expensive. There’s waiting overnight involved¬†and the end result does not yield nearly as much as one would think. Therefore, I will no longer feel guilty for shelling out an extra three dollars a carton to have my¬†soaked almonds/cashews/what have you squeezed for me. Now, that’s a statement of privilege if I ever heard one, amirite? Regardless, I’ve recently been reading some pretty scary articles about the ethical implications of milk (which is not news, as you can see from the article dates, but I’m just trying to be more informed). So I’m currently in the process of switching completely over to non-dairy milk, unless I can make it to a farm and watch the milk come from the well-treated cow. Or a world-wide restructuring of the production of milk happens. Y’know, easy and possible things like that. As of right now, I’ve been able to phase out milk in every area except my coffee, where several splashes of 2% make their home on a daily basis. Almond milk is too weak; coconut milk is too rich; most creamers are full of sugar. Complaint complaint complaint. I’m working on it! I’ll figure something out. Still, it was about time I learned to make my own, and when this nog presented itself in the December¬†issue of Bon App√©tit, I knew it was a sign.¬†The original recipe also describes serving the drink with whipped egg whites on top, which I did not do, as I am scared of raw eggs, but feel free to follow the link and try that yourself.

SO, I have listed directions for how to make this drink¬†100% from scratch, and also my suggestions¬†for how to make it a little semi-homemade, because, as I said in my last post, sometimes¬†store bought is fine. I recommend using almond milk -or soy, if you’re into that- because they’re the most common non-dairy milks and therefore the most affordable. Happy holidays!

Nog (from Bon Appétit)

1 c raw cashews

1 c skin-on raw hazelnuts

2 wide strips orange peel

2 cinnamon sticks

2 star anise pods

4 cloves

1 13.5-oz can coconut milk

2 tbsp agave syrup

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 c dark or spiced rum (OR if you’re me, some kind of whiskey) – optional

4 pieces of cheesecloth

Combine cashews and hazelnuts with 4 cups of hot water in a large bowl. Tie the orange peel, cinnamon, anise, and cloves in a piece of cheesecloth, lightly crush spices with a wooden spoon, and place in the nut mixture. Let sit overnight, covering with a lid/plastic wrap after the mixture gets to room temperature.

Remove spice bundle and discard. Blend nut mixture (I had to do mine in two batches) for two minutes. Line a fine-mesh sieve with cheesecloth and place over a large bowl. Pour nut mixture through sieve and squeeze out as much liquid as possible (this also will be easier if you do it 3-4 times, replacing the cheesecloth each time).

Pour the coconut milk into a separate bowl. Whisk well, until the cream and water are smooth. Add coconut milk to nut milk. Whisk in the agave and vanilla until smooth. Cover and chill for about three hours.

Before serving, whisk up the nog to freshen the froth, then pour into a punch bowl along with your desired liquor. Top with a sprinkle of cinnamon or nutmeg!


 

Quick-and-Easy Nog variation (adapted from above)

4 c unsweetened almond milk (I recommend this brand, because they only use less than 2% alternative thickeners- much better than most out there!)

1 tsp ground cinnamon

1/2 tsp ground cloves

1 tsp orange extract

1/4-1/2 tsp anise extract (personal preference)

+ everything listed above (no cheesecloth needed)

Place almond milk, spices, and extracts in a large saucepan over medium low heat. Cook for about 5-7 minutes, or until spices are aromatic. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature. Follow above instructions starting with the coconut milk.

 

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Drinks

142

Minty Orange Gimlet (V, GF)

As I walked to class on Monday night, I realized it was getting dark. Dark.¬†At 7:30 at night. So if going to night class wasn’t depressing enough, it was actually getting kind of cold and windy. Not to mention people were rushing around campus looking stressed because they’d likely spent the weekend at the bar instead of the library finishing that paper due at midnight. School worries aside, and being completely¬†honest, I love fall. It’s my favorite season. Sweaters, pumpkins, crunchy leaves, all that good crap. BUT in order to get there I have to endure the waves of sadness that manifest themselves in setting sun shadows of late September.¬†Does it make sense that I love fall with a passion but can’t stand how the earth gets there? Absolutely not. But that’s the way it goes! And with these precious hours of post-7pm daylight dwindling, so is the time for big frosty cocktails leisurely being sipped in the sun. While I’m as big a fan of mulled cider as the next person, I just can’t shake my true fondness¬†for fresh cocktails.

Spoilers, I did make this drink¬†quite a while ago. On a lazy Sunday I peeled an orange listening to the sounds of grass being mowed through the open window. The syrup boiled and I picked mint from the herb planters in my backyard. As I rinsed the leaves off with the garden hose I heard my little next door neighbors attempts to woo passing cars with 25-cent cups of lemonade. I muddled mint and orange and added gin and then I drank that cocktail¬†on my porch in warm July sun. And then I drank two more and then I fell asleep. Sounds just terrible, doesn’t it? And in case you were wondering, orange simple syrup is pretty much how¬†I imagine rays of summer sunlight would taste if you melted them into a glass. Considering the temperature outside is currently 41 degrees, I could really use the reminder of the cocktail hour that once was. I bet you could too.

 

Gimlet (serves one)

1/2-1 shots orange simple syrup (see recipe below)

1 1/2 shots vodka (or gin)

1/2 shot lime juice

1/4 orange, sliced

mint leaves

seltzer

ice

Make the orange simple syrup and let it cool completely. In the bottom of a glass, muddle sliced orange and mint. In a cocktail shaker combine syrup, lime juice, vodka and ice. Shake well and pour into the glass with muddled orange and mint and fresh ice.

Orange Simple Syrup (from Bon Appetit)

1/2 c cane sugar

Zest from one orange (removed in large strips with vegetable peeler)

Add zest, sugar, and 1/2 c water to a small saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring until sugar is dissolved. Let cool; cover and chill for at least 2 hours. Strain syrup into a small jar or bowl. Leftovers can be stored in the fridge, tightly covered, for several weeks.

 

 

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Drinks

124

Frozen Cherry Limeade

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Happy Fourth of July! I can’t say I care much about this holiday for any reason except for no one makes¬†a face as I open my first beer around noon and then spend the next eight hours talking passionately about watching fireworks. Which certainly isn’t bad! I’ll take any¬†excuse to day drink. But in all seriousness, this has been an interesting year for being American, as it usually tends to be. Even just this week the¬†Supreme Court of the land of the free decided employers with religious objections have the right the deny contraception coverage under Obamacare. But vasectomies and Viagra are still covered, of course. So that’s fun. I’ve decided I will just be grateful I don’t work for a business that feels they have the right to decide what I do or do not put in my body. And obviously eat a lot of dessert because dessert cures everything¬†makes bad things seem less bad for like 20 minutes. Hey, I’ll take it.

So I thought I’d make a pretty red and blue frozen cocktail today- it’s very cold and very tart, perfect for the 95% humidity that’s currently consuming Jersey. Scroll down after the cocktail for more red white and blue recipes- make one! Or two! Or all ¬†of them and then collapse at 2 pm from too much sugar..

Cherry Limeade (serves 1)

1 cup frozen cherries

splash pomegranate juice

1 1/2 oz gin

1 oz lime juice

1/2 oz simple syrup (optional)

two handfuls blueberries

Combine all ingredients except the blueberries in a blender and blend until smooth. Add a handful of ice cubes if it’s not thick enough for your liking or more juice if it’s too thick. Place one handful of blueberries in the bottom of a tall glass. Pour in the cocktail, then top with the second handful of blueberries!

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And now some dessert recipes for your Fourth of July festivities!

These Vegan Lingonberry Bars are so easy to whip up if you decide last minute to throw/attend a Fourth of July picnic. If you don’t have lingonberry jam, just swap it for raspberry. And then make a tray with blackberry jam to really embrace the colors of the day!

Lemon Raspberry Blueberry Sorbet is the easiest thing if you have an ice cream maker (but you can make do without one, check out the recipe to find out how!)

Try topping my White Chocolate Cinnamon Pudding with fresh strawberries or raspberries to get into the holiday!

Strawberry Shortcake is even more festive when raspberries, blueberries, and blackberries are added..

Blueberry Crumb Pie is out of this world, and always disappears from picnics in mere minutes. Just look at the color of your tongue after you eat it and tell me you’re not celebrating the holiday!

 

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119

Blood Orange Vodka Soda Plus

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No, that’s not a typo, I’ve decided to call this cocktail the Blood Orange Vodka Soda Plus, wordiness and grammatical correctness be damned! Creating this¬†cocktail was my first experience with¬†Cinzano Bianco, an Italian vermouth. I’m very much a fan! It balances out the sharp citrusy orange juice and its herbs and spices highlight the rose water. This is a perfect summer cocktail, it’s very fresh and not too strong. Not to mention it’s super pretty..

Drink (serves one)

1 shot vodka

1 shot Cinzano Bianco

1/2 shot lemon juice

Splash of rose water

Blood orange juice

Seltzer

Pour liquor, lemon juice, and a splash of rose water into a tall glass with ice. Fill the glass 3/4 of the way full with blood orange juice. Stir. Top off the the glass with seltzer. Garnish with lime.

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109

Rum Punch

Is it summer yet? I know I wish it was. The longest year of my college career is coming to a close (ONE. MORE. WEEK) so I say we drink. Let’s pretend we’re on a warm beach, sipping one of these as we watch the sun set. Yes? Yes. Keeping the post short and sweet so we can get to the good stuff. You’re welcome.

Punch (serves 1, adapted from Martha Stewart.com)

Р2 oz light rum

Р1 oz orange juice

– 1/2 oz pineapple guava juice

Р1/2 oz lime juice

Рsplash cranberry juice

– splash grenadine

– Ice

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Shake well and serve, garnishing with fresh lime and cherries. Cheers!

 

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